Realizr

The yes of Know

173 notes

ancientpeoples:

Faience vessel in the form of Eros riding a duck
Probably made in Egypt
c.300-250 BC
Said to be from Tanagra, Greece
This jug is the finest faience vessel surviving from the Hellenistic world. It takes the form of Eros, the Greek god of love, clinging to the neck of a duck on whose back he is riding.
The combination of traditional Egyptian techniques with a purely Greek theme is characteristic of the products of the faience industry at Alexandria. The court of the Ptolemies (the Hellenistic Greek rulers of Egypt) at Alexandria was a great artistic centre. It became the focus for cultural exchange between the Greek and Egyptian worlds and their distinctive artistic traditions.
Source: British Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Faience vessel in the form of Eros riding a duck

Probably made in Egypt

c.300-250 BC

Said to be from Tanagra, Greece

This jug is the finest faience vessel surviving from the Hellenistic world. It takes the form of Eros, the Greek god of love, clinging to the neck of a duck on whose back he is riding.

The combination of traditional Egyptian techniques with a purely Greek theme is characteristic of the products of the faience industry at Alexandria. The court of the Ptolemies (the Hellenistic Greek rulers of Egypt) at Alexandria was a great artistic centre. It became the focus for cultural exchange between the Greek and Egyptian worlds and their distinctive artistic traditions.

Source: British Museum 

3,941 notes

staff:

Welcome to the second installment of our government transparency report, where we explain in (hopefully not boring) detail the government requests we receive for account information, and how we respond to those requests. 
How many requests? From January to June 2014, we provided information—either user data or blog content—for 84% of the requests made, covering 199 blog URLs. This represents approximately 0.00010% of all blogs on Tumblr. Not a huge number, but this is about full disclosure, no matter what the scale. 
Also in this report: some emerging trends in the data, and some information about our improved user notice policy. Plus: a few additional gems to keep you fully educated about when the government is requesting your information, and what we’re doing to defend your rights. 
We take the privacy of your information seriously, as you know, and we’ll be auditing ourselves twice a year from here on out. Look for our next report in early 2015.

staff:

Welcome to the second installment of our government transparency report, where we explain in (hopefully not boring) detail the government requests we receive for account information, and how we respond to those requests.

How many requests? From January to June 2014, we provided information—either user data or blog content—for 84% of the requests made, covering 199 blog URLs. This represents approximately 0.00010% of all blogs on Tumblr. Not a huge number, but this is about full disclosure, no matter what the scale.

Also in this report: some emerging trends in the data, and some information about our improved user notice policy. Plus: a few additional gems to keep you fully educated about when the government is requesting your information, and what we’re doing to defend your rights.

We take the privacy of your information seriously, as you know, and we’ll be auditing ourselves twice a year from here on out. Look for our next report in early 2015.

12 notes

Novels are not bound by the rules of reportage. Far from it. They’re predicated on delivering experience. Of course, they seem to abide by certain basic rules, but these are no more restrictive than the law of gravity is in constraining the variety of living things on the planet. By delivering experience, novels can alter the stance we adopt toward news—not much, I’m sure, but they can make it a little more difficult for us to consign “other people” to our tidy boxes.
How Do You Know?, Jonathan Lee interviews Zia Haider Rahman - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics (via guernicamag)

(via guernicamag)